How far have you traveled for birth control?

What's the farthest you've traveled for birth control?

222 million women & girls worldwide lack access to contraceptives. What about you?

Question of the Week:
What's the farthest you've traveled for birth control? Share your story below.

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Comments (32)

  1. I was living overseas for a number of years but maintained my doctors in the States. So, I would have them sent to me in the UK on a regular basis. The distance was between 4,000 - 5,000 air miles.
  2. I started taking birth control when I was in high school. I live in Cambodia. I could go to any pharmacy to pick up my supply. I could buy a year's worth of birth control pills for $6 ($.50 per month). It always made me laugh that this birth control was at the time sponsored by USAID. When I moved to the US to find how difficult it was to get birth control (and I had health insurance and pharmacies within walking distance), it was easier for me to wait until I visited Cambodia to get my year's supply. So that's about 8000 miles. Now I'm back in Cambodia and thankfully my current pharmacy is 5 minute walk from my home. My pill is no longer sponsored by USAID, but its still only $.50 a monthly pack.
  3. I have always had access to birth control in California. Now if I wanted it, I would simple ask my Kaiser doctor for it--8 miles away. Most public California college campuses offer ffree birth control to their students. This is an intelligent service and reflects true concern for women's health.
  4. I don't have to travel at all for birth control. I simply abstain from sexual encounters. There, wasn't that simple? My body, my choice!
  5. Twenty years ago when I was in college, I was lucky that I had a Planned Parenthood clinic that was only a short distance away by bus to get a prescription. Now Republican law makers in my US state have closed many Planned Parenthood locations and created laws that force women to jump through hoops to get basic birth control and if you are lower income (like I was) forget it. This is strange to say things were better in the past - moving backward, not forward, but that is the case today in the Midwest (and other regions) of the USA.
  6. Back when I was in college, health services definitely did not offer birth control. (I graduated in 1962.) I had to ask around for the name of a sympathetic gynecologist, whose offices i visited by bus, several miles away. The only method on offer was the diaphragm, which I hated, because it was uncomfortable and required jelly from a pharmacist, another embarrassing visit. The pill was not yet generally available. in the end, I became pregnant because I hated the diaphragm and i counted wrong about the time of fertility. The young man I was in love with, who previously had said he loved me more than anything else in the world, married me only reluctantly, after failing twice to get me an abortion. So my life thereafter was spent digging out from under this mess and the psychological consequences of it.
  7. The drugstore is only thre block far home; however it became into a nightmare to get birth control. I arrived there and asked for it, the clerck told me there wasn´t any available despite I was watching them just infront of me; she argued I was not married (I live in a very small town, she knows my family and I) so, I have no access to any birth control until I get a husband and his permission to use them. I searched in other places nearby, and the answer was exactly the same. Then I had to catch the bus, travel 7 kilometers and finally got them in the capital city, of course after the advise/disclaim from the woman at the desk: "you have to ask for permission from your husband before using the pills ". This happened in 2011and obviously I wasn´t married at all.
  8. I started taking birth control when I was in high school. I live in Cambodia. I could go to any pharmacy to pick up my supply. I could buy a year's worth of birth control pills for $6 ($.50 per month). It always made me laugh that this birth control was at the time sponsored by USAID. When I moved to the US to find how difficult it was to get birth control (and I had health insurance and pharmacies within walking distance), it was easier for me to wait until I visited Cambodia to get my year's supply. So that's about 8000 miles. Now I'm back in Cambodia and thankfully my current pharmacy is 5 minute walk from my home. My pill is no longer sponsored by USAID, but its still only $.50 a monthly pack.
  9. As a university student I was unable to afford health insurance and my home state of Nevada didn't provide funding to local Planned Parenthood clinics to cover birth control. When traveling abroad in Brazil and Thailand, armed with the info sheet from my US birth control I was able to find an equivalent generic form of the pill in those two countries. First in Brazil I bought a two-year supply and later in Thailand I also bought the same amount for less than $6 a month. It was only through traveling half way across the globe that I was able to find affordable birth control during my college years.
  10. A pesar de que la Clínica Comunitaria par las Mujeres no se localizaba lejos de donde vivía, la ida fue paso gigante para mi! El viaje que hace tu mente, cuerpo y tus nervios para acudir a servicios de salud que son medio tabú en la mirada del público es algo como un torbellino. Sentí que debí haber preguntado, "Estoy haciendo algo ilegal?" al entrar a la clínica. Sin embargo, y con mucha suerte fue que, después de mi visita clínica, me sentí segura de mis decisiones y también muy apoyada al tomar responsabilidad sobre mi salud sexual y reproductivo. Lo único que me dejó sintiendo rara fue el hombre que me miraba tirado piropos cuando salí del complejo de oficinas donde se situaba la clínica. "Por qué, man, POR QUE te mantienes afuera de una clínica para mujeres y le miras a una mujer con ojos deseosos? Qué retorcido es el mundo," pensé.
  11. Though the Women's Community Clinic was not far from where i lived, the trip seemed like a huge step for me! The journey your mind, body, and nerves go through to get health services that are taboo-like in the public eye is quite the ride. I felt like the question, "Am i doing something illegal?" was the first question i should ask when entering the clinic. Luckily, as a result of my visit, I left feeling quite secure in my choices and very supported in taking responsibility over my sexual and reproductive health. The only weird thing was getting hit on just as i was leaving the building. "Why dude, WHY would you stand outside of a women's clinic and stare a woman up and down. What a twisted world," I thought to myself.
  12. When I was in college, I had to go off campus to Planned Parenthood for birth control pills, as those services weren't available at the campus health center. Still, it was only about 3 miles by bus.
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